HJ.
crystal-poison:
“An anthropologist proposed a game to children in an african tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the children that whoever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run, they all took eachothers hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats.
When he asked them why they had run like that when one could have had all the fruits for himself, they said ‘UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the others are sad?’ (‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are)”

crystal-poison:

“An anthropologist proposed a game to children in an african tribe. He put a basket full of fruit near a tree and told the children that whoever got there first won the sweet fruits. When he told them to run, they all took eachothers hands and ran together, then sat together enjoying their treats.

When he asked them why they had run like that when one could have had all the fruits for himself, they said ‘UBUNTU, how can one of us be happy if all the others are sad?’ (‘UBUNTU’ in the Xhosa culture means: ‘I am because we are)”

I don’t just want to take your breath away. I want to rip it from your mouth and keep it locked away between my teeth. You can only have it back if you kiss me again.
Meggie Royer, Literary Sexts
My nights are for overthinking, my mornings are for oversleeping.
(via lecitykitty)
I usually solve problems by letting them devour me.
Franz Kafka (via paintdeath)
Religions exist because people would rather have a wrong answer than no answer at all.

Chuck Palahniuk (via jillian-paiged)

Thought this same thing so many times

(via mysweetdesperation)

It’s amazing how words can do that, just shred your insides apart.
Lauren Oliver, Delirium #1 (via quotethat)

stories-yet-to-be-written:

Where Children Sleep by James Mollison

Where Children Sleep is an eye-opening project by photographer James Mollison that takes a look at children from all across the globe and the diverse environments they go to sleep in. The series presents a portrait of each child or adolescent accompanied by a shot of their bedrooms. While some have a bounty of possessions and a lavish bed to rest their head on at night, the images reveal that some are not as fortunate.

Mollison gives an intimate perspective of these children, offering some sense of their lifestyle through their personal bedroom. At times, though, it can be difficult to even refer to the space they sleep in as a bedroom as there is no actual bed. In the case of Bilal, a 6-year-old Bedouin shepherd boy, the young boy is left to sleep “outdoors with his father’s herd of goats.” Alternatively, 4-year-old Kaya in Tokyo is adorned in frilly dresses that her mother spends $1,000 on every month, which is reflected in the abundance of toys and luxury items that fill her room.

The series is currently available as a photo essay and fine art book that offers a variety of lifestyles, as seen through the portraits of children and their bedrooms.

More pictures at My Modern Met, Visit James Mollison’s website here

Drugs become addictive the day you decide to use it to fill the gaps in your heart instead of using it for short entertainment.
(via valiantschool)

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